There are worries from the federal finance minister that blockades from the Idle No More movement may have a serious impact on the national economy.

Today is a day of action where aboriginal groups are threatening to block highways, rail lines and even border crossings across the country.

The largest demonstration will be in Windsor, ON, where protesters are expected to block the Ambassador Bridge — the busiest border crossing on the continent — for a couple of hours.

A flash mob was planned for the lunch hour at the World Exchange Plaza, downtown.

The plan from Aboriginal groups is to hurt the federal government in the pocketbook, to send the message that they want action on treaty rights and land claims.

“Of course I am (worried), because of the fragility of the economic recovery,” said Finance Minister Jim Flaherty.  “We’re looking at economic growth in Canada this year of somewhere areound two per cent.”

While one day of action won’t be a major disruption, in the future if these blockades last for longer periods of time, it will be a different situation.

“It would be about a week, at the earliest, before you would see any impact of the blockades,” said Ian Lee, professor at the University of Ottawa’s Sprott School of Business.  “Certain areas: groceries, retailing, gasoline stations.”

Both CN Rail and Via Rail tell 1310News, they are prepared to take appropriate measures for any incidents that arise.